Frequently Asked Questions

WHO IS CASA, THE MOVEMENT & WHY IS THE ORGANIZATION NEEDED IN PROTECTING CHILDREN?

CASA Kane County is a nonprofit, volunteer organization that advocates for the best interest of abused and neglected children within the Juvenile Court System. We began in 1988 by concerned citizens and we work independently, but in collaboration with our judiciary, agencies and the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) to find permanent and safe homes for children in the foster care system. The organization recruits, trains and supervises community volunteers that are then supported by 22 professional staff, 25 Board of Directors and 45 Chairman Advisory Panel members.
The first CASA program began in 1977 in Seattle Washington by a Judge named David Soukup. He knew more needed to be done in the lives of children in the foster care system. That movement sparked and today we have over 1,000 organization nationally.
The children we serve come into abuse/neglect or private guardianship cases that makes up together nearly 500 children in Kane County. Children range in age from birth to 21. They have been removed from their homes by (DCFS) Department of Child and Family Services because of abuse or neglect. They leave most familiar things and people behind—home, family, friends, and school and find themselves in a world filled with social workers, lawyers, judges and courtrooms where life-altering decisions are being made on their behalf. The majority of children are placed outside of their homes with relatives, in foster homes, shelters or residential facilities.
In court proceedings involving abused and neglected children, CASA Kane County provides an unbiased, child-focused point of view that is vital to help determine what situations will allow a child to thrive. In most cases, the children represented by CASA have been removed from their homes due to abuse or neglect. A judge then must decide if a child can safely return home to his or her family or if a permanent home must be arranged to keep a child healthy and safe. When considering the actions of parents or child welfare agencies, it’s the child who has the most at stake and their needs can often be overlooked. The CASA/GAL volunteer and organization acts as the voice for each child to ensure their best interests are in the forefront.
CASA programs are the only volunteer organizations that are directly connected to the court. Our CASA/GAL volunteers are sworn-in and appointed by a judge to advocate for a child who otherwise may not be heard. As adults come and go in the lives of abused and neglected children, they desperately need one consistent adult to stay with them for the length of their court case. They research and learn what the child’s needs are, make recommendations and prevent a child from falling through the cracks of the child welfare system.
CASA prides itself on the quality assurance and confidentiality that we must adhere too seriously. We take steps to protect and ensure the safety of our children and CASA volunteers. All volunteers are required and sworn under oath to adhere to a strict privacy and confidentiality rule and my not share information with any outside parties. Additionally, we do not sell or otherwise disclose information about our volunteers or supporters outside of our immediate organization. We do not sell or exchange your information with any other organizations, public, private or nonprofit.
The National CASA Association is a nonprofit organization that represents and serves local CASA programs at different levels. All CASA programs must pass a comprehensive quality assessment in order to retain their membership status with the national organization. There are more than 1,000 programs throughout the United States and 38 organizations within the State of Illinois. Illinois CASA and the National CASA Association are supportive of local programs and provide valuable information regarding marketing, training and public awareness.

WHO, WHAT AND HOW TO BECOME A CASA/GAL VOLUNTEER?

Prospective CASA/GAL volunteers should attend a general information meeting, submit an application with references, complete an interview with the program staff and attend a 45 hour training. A complete criminal history and child abuse registry check is performed on each applicant. Upon completion of their training, CASA/GAL volunteers are sworn in by the Juvenile Court Judge and promise to maintain strict confidentiality, objectivity, and professionalism throughout their appointment

A Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) and Guardian ad Litem (GAL) is a community volunteer who is recruited, trained and supervised by a CASA Kane County Advocate Supervisor and appointed by a Judge to represent the best interests of abused and neglected children during a dependency case. CASA/GAL volunteers spend an average of 10-15 hours a month advocating for a child and the average case is three years. The volunteer gathers information from those who know the child best and can and acts as the “eyes and ears” for the Judge during the child’s time in foster care.

CASA volunteers are compassionate, objective, self-motivated individuals from the community who are trained to speak on behalf of abused and neglected children. They come from all walks of life and many work full-time.  In Kane County, we are appointed as the Guardian ad Litem (GAL) and have extensive responsibility and commitment to provide the judge with an unbiased view as an appointed officer of the court.

A CASA/GAL volunteer provides a judge with objective information about the child to help the court make life changing decisions about that child’s future. Each case is as unique as the child involved. The CASA/GAL volunteer learns by researching, interviewing and listening to the child in determining what’s in their best interest- to be reunified with their parents, placed in guardianship with a relative or adopted by a foster family. The CASA volunteer makes a recommendation on placement and services to the judge and follows through until the case is closed.

To prepare a recommendation, the CASA/GAL volunteer talks with the child and speaks to parents, family members, foster parents, social workers, school officials, health providers and anyone else significant in the child’s life. The CASA/GAL volunteer also reviews records pertaining to the child – including school records, medical records, caseworker reports, and other documents.

Children are moved from one foster home to another and there are often frequent changes in caseworkers, attorneys and judges. As the one consistent person in the child’s life, we ask that our CASA/GAL volunteers be willing to make a minimum two to three year commitment or until the case is closed. However, a typical volunteer spends 10 hours a month on a case and the average length is three years.

WHY ARE CASA/GAL VOLUNTEERS NEEDED AND WHAT IS THE COMMITMENT, QUALIFICATIONS AND BENEFITS?

The CASA/GAL volunteer is often the only one constant person advocating for the minor(s) throughout the duration of the case, often holding the child’s history, and providing a caring and supportive person that the child can trust.  The on-going presence of a CASA/GAL volunteer helps children to thrive in foster care and ensures a safe and permanent home.

Children are moved from one foster home to another and there are often frequent changes in caseworkers, attorneys and judges.  As the one consistent person in the child’s life, we ask that our CASA/GAL volunteers be willing to make a minimum two year commitment until the case is closed. A typical volunteer spends 10 hours a month on a case and the average length is three years.

CASA volunteers are compassionate, objective, self-motivated individuals from the community who are trained to speak on behalf of abused and neglected children. They come from all walks of life and many work full-time.  In Kane County, we are appointed as the Guardian ad Litem (GAL) and have extensive responsibility and commitment to provide the judge with an unbiased view as an appointed officer of the court.

After the child(ren) are removed from their home due to unsafe living conditions, a shelter care hearing takes place within 48 hours.  At this court hearing the Judge will appoint CASA Kane County as the Guardian ad Litem (GAL) to the child(ren).  CASA then collects as much information as possible to best match the child(ren) with the experiences, expertise and geographic location of each CASA/GAL volunteer.

Being a CASA volunteer is both rewarding and challenging.  The child welfare system is bureaucratic and overburdened, and CASA volunteers often have to work hard to get the system to respond.  Because of court decisions, social service plans and other factors out of our control, the volunteer can face disappointments.  The biggest reward comes on the day when the child is placed in a safe, permanent home and knowing they made a difference in a child’s life.

The most important benefit of being a CASA volunteer is the chance to make a meaningful contribution to the life of a child who desperately needs your help.  Many volunteers choose to stay in contact with their CASA “kids” even as they transition into an adult.

WHY CASA WHEN THERE ARE ATTORNEYS, DCFS &
OTHER AGENCIES?

Social service caseworkers are employed by the Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) or other contracted agencies.  The CASA/GAL volunteer does not replace a social service caseworker; they provide a third party objective view to the court.  The CASA/GAL is assigned to one case at a time, giving them the time to spend learning about each child.  In addition, social service caseworkers often have 20 or more caseloads.

No! There are other child advocacy organizations, but CASA Kane County is the only program where volunteers are appointed by the court to represent a child’s best interests.

The GAL may be an attorney or court appointed special advocate (CASA) and have both. For attorneys, the requisite training is satisfied within existing continuing legal education obligations. Our GAL Attorney’s represent the CASA and children as guardian’s ad litem in juvenile court proceedings.

The CASA/GAL are appointed by the juvenile court to look into the allegations made by the parties, to speak with each of them, their witnesses, the child, educators, therapists, medical practitioners, relatives, daycare providers, and others who have information that is relevant to the underlying issues and helpful to the GAL in formulating opinions and making recommendations to the Court about what outcome would serve the child’s best interest.

CASA’s are lay, volunteer GAL’s. They are trained in abuse and neglect (deprivation) cases, juvenile court procedures, and have met the requirements of (and are supervised by) a CASA program

HOW EFFECTIVE IS THE CASA ORGANIZATION AND HOW DO THEY
MEASURE ITS SUCCESS?

CASA Kane County has developed a number of measurements to ensure program stability.  We are proud to be an accredited organization of the National CASA Association.  The organization has child safety and well-being goals that reflect what the program needs to achieve for the children that they serve.  CASA strives to achieve permanency goals as quickly as possible while maintaining advocate retention and reward.  

CASA has been endorsed by the American Bar Association, the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention of the U.S. Department of Justice.  CASA is described as “the eyes and ears of the court,” and frequently acts as “the arms and legs” of an overworked child protective system.

Nearly 100% of our volunteers’ recommendations are accepted by the Judge.  Children who suffer abuse and neglect are at-risk of mental illness, unemployment, homelessness or worse—engaging in criminal activity.  A major factor in preventing these outcomes is the presence of a concerned and consistent adult in that child’s life.  CASA Kane County is appointed to 100% of abuse and neglect cases in the 16th Juvenile Circuit Court of Illinois and children represented by a CASA/GAL last year did not experience a recurrence of abuse and neglect.

Preliminary findings show that children who have been assigned CASA volunteers tend to spend less time in court and less time in the foster care system than those who do not have a CASA volunteer.  Judges have observed that children advocated by CASA also have better chances of finding permanent homes. 

CASA/GAL volunteers act as the child’s Guardian ad Litem, which means that they represent the child in litigation or in court proceedings.  They do not serve as a child’s legal guardian or custodian and they have no control over the child’s property but is an officer of the court.  What the CASA volunteer does have is the authority to gather information, to bring witnesses who will testify about what is best for the child involved and to make final recommendations to the Judge as an independent party in all court proceedings.  When others may not have the facts and/or do not have the time, it is the CASA who can provide critical and life changing information to ensure that our children get the chance to thrive and are not lost in the overburdened system.

CASA programs are the only volunteer organizations that are directly connected to the court. Our CASA/GAL volunteers are sworn-in and appointed by a judge to advocate for a child who otherwise may not be heard. As adults come and go in the lives of abused and neglected children, they desperately need one consistent adult to stay with them for the length of their court case. They research and learn what the child’s needs are, make recommendations and prevent a child from falling through the cracks of the child welfare system.

WHY DOES CASA NEED FUNDING & HOW DO I DONATE,
OR ATTEND A SPECIAL EVENT?

It costs CASA Kane County $4,500 to serve one child for an entire year.  This includes the time and resources needed to recruit high quality volunteers, conduct background checks and provide an initial 45-hour training program in addition to the on-going training for over 225 active volunteers throughout the year.  This also consists of the highly educated staff who can provide the experience, knowledge and resources to the volunteers as they navigate the child welfare system. If our 225 GAL volunteers did not exist it would cost the county millions as they would have to pay attorneys or other professional social workers.

CASA Kane County must raise its entire operating budget through private donations and grants. The organization is able to do this by diversifying its potential funding sources and secures about one third of its revenue from special events, one third from private and federal grants and one third from annual giving and major gifts. It is an immense challenge every year to start January all over again. The CASA staff along with the Board of Directors are always aggressively fundraising and making new contacts, properly stewarding the existing supporters, and securing the funding needed to maintain its operations to serve all children who come into our courtroom.

The organization receives limited state and federal funding and must raise the additional funding through private donations and grants. Operating a nonprofit organization of this size requires an experienced professional staff to recruit, train, retain and supervise the 225 CASA volunteers who serve over 500 children annually in a community of over a half million in population. There are also administrative, fundraising and operating expenses and it is required by law for a nonprofit to remain transparent, compliant and to maintain the quality advocacy organization that our community expects.

CASA Children’s Champion Celebration Gala, Golf for a Child Classic, Concert for a Cause, Clays for Kids or Super Heroes Luncheon

 Our annual events equate to over a third of our budget.  They bring together our leadership, committees, community and donors to celebrate the successes of our child advocacy while knowing the money raised will support the on-going needs of the 500 children we support the annually that we serve in the foster care system. Go to our website to learn more.

You can support CASA Kane County through individual and corporate donations, event sponsorships, corporate matching gift program, leaving a legacy or by hosting a fundraising event.  Your contribution will help support CASA/GAL volunteers in their efforts to help our most vulnerable children. 

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF HELPING A CHILD?

By helping to save a child from a life of abuse and neglect, we provide a safe alternative to the cycle of victims becoming abusers and  passing on the heredity of violence. Abused and neglected children have an advocate who is committed to and solely focused on that child’s welfare. Children with CASA/GAL volunteers are not faced with “falling through the cracks” of the child welfare system. In addition to giving back to the community, you will receive a charitable tax deduction and know that your dollars are impacting a human life.

Decisions are made every day which affect the lives of children in foster care.  CASA volunteers help these decisions to be made more promptly and with greater information and sensitivity to their individual needs.  CASA volunteers work for quicker, better outcomes and provide children in foster care with the knowledge that there is a community around them who cares.

 

COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOR POTENTIAL
CASA VOLUNTEERS:

Many people become CASA volunteers because they are interested in eventually becoming a foster/adoptive parent, however, you may not be a CASA volunteer while you are an active foster parent. 

Yes!  Unless you will be away frequently and for long durations (one month or more), your vacation or travel plans are not likely to interfere with your advocacy.

Yes.  We are not able to see the results of any previous background checks you’ve gone through and must perform a new check so we can directly receive and review the results.  Background checks and fingerprinting are required for all volunteers as well as for all active CASA volunteers every four years.

Yes.  All volunteers new to CASA Kane County must complete our entire training, as program specifics and training requirements may vary from other regions.

Yes!  CASA Kane County allows people to work as teams on cases together.  In that situation, two CASA volunteers would be paired to work with at least two children.

Yes.  You must own a computer and have the knowledge of our pre-service training materials ready to go.  In addition our case management software is online and in order to complete court reports, and to communicate by email with professionals and parties to the case during your CASA service.  In addition most of our information is now sent electronically. 

 

Not necessarily.  Case assignment is based on need.  Though we do ask for your preferences around age and gender, we also ask that you be as open-minded and flexible as possible when it comes to who you work with.  CASA provides support through a dedicated advocate supervisor and we also provide frequent opportunities to increase your knowledge and skills in areas where you have little to no experience.

We do not assign CASA volunteers to advocate for a child with whom a relationship already exists.  This is to help ensure objectivity, as well as the integrity of the CASA program.

Yes most definitely.  CASA Kane County has a training program of nearly 50 hours of pre-service. All volunteers are then matched with an advocate supervisor who is a member of the CASA staff.  The training and education team also provide individual guidance, support and additional education during their time as an advocate.  The supervisor oversees and manages the day to day case requirements and needs.

Yes.  We ask that all CASA volunteers, regardless of their situation, commit to volunteering with us for a minimum of three years or as long as the case is open for the child’s consistency.  Remember they constantly have people coming in and out of their lives and need that one person they know they can count on. 

 

CASA holds the safety of children as its highest priority.  A child’s best chance for love and protection is often with his or her birth family.  Along with our Judiciary in Kane County we believe that if the return home goal can be accomplished safely then services are put into place.    We are all supportive of reunification when it is in the best interest of the children involved.  However, CASA will only advocate for children to return home if they can so safely, receiving the love, stability and protection they deserve.

Because the children that CASA volunteers work with have suffered abuse and trauma, it is always recommended that the CASA volunteer refrain from physical touch unless the child initiates the contact. As a relationship is established, the child may be open to a hug, but the CASA should first ask if the child is comfortable with it; do not attempt to hug a child unless they have invited you to do so.

Typically, a CASA volunteer will know their next court date at the conclusion of the current hearing. The court will set the date right at the hearing. The CASA office will also typically remind CASAs of their court dates a few weeks prior. For the CASA volunteers very first hearing, it will depend on when the CASA is appointed and when the next hearing is scheduled

CASA volunteers are valuable because they come from all walks of life and can pull from a variety of professional and personal experiences. You don’t need to be a lawyer or legally savvy to be a great CASA, but over time you will learn a lot about the dependency process, so there is a chance you will become legally savvy.

CASA volunteers use an online contact log to track all of the work that they do on a case. This includes face-to-face and phone conversations, reviewing records, attempting to contact, observing a visit, researching online, etc. Contact information is added for the CASA office to review the specifics and frequency of the case and after each time you visit a child. 

During the course of a case, a CASA volunteer will most likely work with more than one case manager. The reasons for a change could be due to a high volume of cases, staff turnover, or reductions in the amount of staff. Whatever the reason, it is always very important for the CASA to build a strong relationship with whoever is assigned to the case.

CASA schedules regular meetings and special in-service trainings for CASA volunteers throughout the year to meet the national and local requirements of their pre and post service training.  Additionally, there are many other training opportunities available to CASAs in the area through other community and statewide organizations. On a national level, National CASA hosts an annual conference.  Our training and education team will be able to provide you with more information about all of your in-service training options.

CASA volunteers interview the children they represent, if the children are old enough to talk.  If not, the CASA observes the baby’s interactions with the various people involved in the baby’s life.  The CASA offers the child a trust based relationship and advocacy, both within and outside the courtroom.  The CASA explains to the child the events that are happening and the roles the judge, lawyers, case workers and others play.  The CASA also encourages the child to express his or her own opinions, fears and hopes and conveys those to the court. In addition, the trust that is built allows the CASA volunteer to encourage the children to express their feelings and to feel safe.  All the while the CASA remains objective observers.

COMMONLY ASKED QUESTIONS FOR CURRENT CASA VOLUNTEERS:

Parents and foster parents may not understand the role of a CASA volunteer on a case. In the event that a parent or foster parent tries to prevent you from seeing your CASA child, you would try to share what your duties and responsibilities are as a CASA, as well as a copy of your court order. If the barrier continues, it is best to contact your supervisor, who will help you determine the best way to educate the parent and ensure that you have access to the child.

Yes, there have been times when parents see the CASA volunteer as a threat to the return of their child. Typically when the CASA explains their “objective” role to understand everything about the case, parents will not respond negatively. There will be times, however, when CASA volunteers must make decisions that may include not returning the child to the parent, and there can be animosity surrounding that stance. A CASA volunteer will need to explain why they are making the recommendation they are, and the facts surrounding that decision; the parents’ reactions will vary when this is the case.

The CASA volunteer should always respect the decision of the child to not visit with the CASA. We should never force children to do things they do not want to do. Careful and slow relationship-building with a child should alleviate this issue, and make the child comfortable enough for outside visits. If it does not, however, the CASA volunteer should still go to the placement and visit the child, spend time and ensure that they are safe, cared for and that their concerns are listened to.

A CASA becomes a concerned and caring adult in a child’s life so it’s important to be aware of the level of conversation which is taking place. If a dialogue moves beyond the level of natural conversation, and into the realm of what would be considered a counseling issue, the CASA needs to share with the child that there are other people or professionals who can help with processing those issues. The CASA volunteer will then seek the support of their advocate supervisor and GAL attorney.

CASA volunteers can take photos of their CASA child for two purposes: to give to the judge on the case and/or to give to the child. Giving the child a scrapbook with photos of your time together is a creative and acceptable way to build your relationship and share memories.

A CASA volunteer must always make the case manager and other team members aware of what his or her opinion is even if it is not in agreement with the team. Remember, the judge wants to know all opinions, and it is to the judge that the CASA recommends what they think should happen. So, disagreeing with the case manager is okay; however it may be frustrating for the CASA to see the case go in a direction that the CASA does not agree with, until a hearing takes place and the judge decides on a course of action. Then, both parties must comply with what the judge has ordered.

A small percentage of CASA volunteers actually form a lasting relationship with the children they serve. It is up to the child, the “forever family,” whether that is their biological family or an adoptive one, and the CASA. Most CASA volunteers are willing to let that relationship go when they know the child is safe in a permanent home, and move on to serve other children.

It is very important to recognize personal boundaries with your CASA children, and while it is appropriate to share some information with them, the focus needs to be on the child. A CASA volunteer should answer a child’s questions in an age-appropriate manner, including questions about personal experiences. Remember what your role is, and that is to gather information so that you can make recommendations to the case team and the judge about what is best for the child. Just as a teacher, therapist or attorney wouldn’t share personal information with a child when in their professional role, neither should a CASA volunteer open their personal lives to a child. Certainly, comments like “when I was younger, I loved to roller skate,” do not cross a personal boundary. In contrast, sharing personal “issues” in your past would not be appropriate.

While attendance at court hearings is a required duty of a CASA, we understand that emergencies may arise that prevent attendance. Should this occur, the CASA volunteer should contact their supervisor, who may either attend for the CASA or ask that a mentor CASA do so.

There is a that delicate balance between getting to know the child enough to be able to present good information to the judge, but staying within the CASA volunteer role. You have a specific role to play, and while it requires you to get to know the child (and ultimately you will care very much about them), it requires that you keep enough of a distance to remain objective. Losing that objectivity and becoming the child’s “friend” could diminish your standing in the eyes of the other court players, who see you then as only the child’s friend, and not an objective observer of the whole situation. Will the child see you as their friend? Probably yes. But to you, and the way you present yourself to the child and others, you have a specific role to play.

Due to confidentiality parameters for teachers, counselors and other professionals who work with children, a CASA volunteer will need to provide the court order to access the information they are seeking. It is best to have a copy of your court order with you and provide it upon request. You may leave a copy of the order with the school or provider.

It is important to recognize personal boundaries with your CASA children, and while it is appropriate to share some information with them, the focus needs to be on the child. A CASA volunteer should answer the child’s question in an age-appropriate manner, including questions about religion. It is okay for a CASA to answer a question about their religion, but not to broach the subject without an inquiry from the child.

Should a child ask to attend your services, your response would be that you’d “have to check with other people to see if that would be okay.” You would advise the case supervisor (as you would any child’s parent) that the child made the request, and they, along with the foster family and biological parents, would have input into whether it is appropriate or not. If everyone agreed that it would be an enriching experience for the child, the CASA could then proceed.

Biological parents tend to be receptive to CASA volunteers because they are striving to get their children back and view the CASA as someone who might be able to help them. However, a parent may not always understand the role of a CASA on a case, and may see you as “their” advocate and attempt to get you to “be on their side” to help them get their children back. Initially, you would try to share what your duties and responsibilities are as a CASA volunteer, as well as a copy of your court order. If the parent is not receptive, it is best to contact your supervisor, who will help you determine the best way to arrange an interview.

You will receive your badge when you have completed your pre-service training and are appointed to a case. If working on a case, a CASA volunteer should always carry their name badge in the event it is needed for identification and verification to access information. The badge should always be worn when coming to the court building. There are many situations however, where wearing the badge might threaten confidentiality (i.e., at a child’s school, when on a visit with the child, etc.) and it is better not to have it in plain sight. We highly recommend that you carry both your CASA ID badge and copies of your court order with you when you are on CASA business.

To protect a CASA volunteer’s own confidentiality and privacy, the state office does not recommend that CASAs give out their personal contact information. However, the final decision is at the discretion of the CASA. If a CASA volunteer doesn’t want to give personal contact information, parties involved in the case can contact your CASA office, and your supervisor will forward the message to you.

Yes, the CASA office schedules monthly coffee talks and evening chats to discuss the pros and cons of the case.  There are also on-going continuing education classes that also bring CASA volunteers together to learn and to talk to fellow CASA volunteers and professional staff. 

As you become familiar with your case, and are called upon to make recommendations, think about the areas where you are concerned about the child and his or her situation and then talk to the DCFS, case worker and your advocate supervisor about possible services that could resolve those concerns. As you continue your CASA work, you will become more and more knowledgeable about services and agencies in your area.  Whatever you are not receiving from the agency, let the supervisor and attorney know as CASA will help provide the additional resources to meet those needs if possible. 

CASA Kane County as a nonprofit organization provides additional direct support to foster children and the CASA volunteers. CASA provides the additional out-of-home care, such as back packs, suitcases, back-to-school supplies, bikes, lessons and tutoring, prom dresses, Christmas presents, gift cards and more. Not all counties do, but usually every county has at least one organization that helps to support the needs of foster children. Check with your advocate supervisor and outreach coordinator to learn more about the items and needs.  

OTHER IMPORTANT QUESTIONS ABOUT CASA:

Come in to learn more about joining a fundraising committee or hosting a third party event to support our child advocacy organization.

Contact the CASA office at 630-232-4484 and we will schedule a CASA representative.

Nearly 100% of our volunteers’ recommendations are accepted by the Judge.  Children who suffer abuse and neglect are at-risk of mental illness, unemployment, homelessness or worse—engaging in criminal activity.  A major factor in preventing these outcomes is the presence of a concerned and consistent adult in that child’s life.  CASA Kane County is appointed to 100% of abuse and neglect cases in the 16th Juvenile Circuit Court of Illinois and children represented by a CASA/GAL last year did not experience a recurrence of abuse and neglect.

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